quotes from reviews

UNIVERSAL CLOCK

[The Universal Clock] should be widely screened and seriously discussed in every production facility throughout the land and, indeed in every classroom. Some people, somewhere, somehow, might then rise up against the tyranny of a system that engulfs us and insist upon experiences that would restore to our television screens the integrity of human consciousness. Then, and only then, could we fully celebrate the achievement of Peter Watkins, and indeed of other fine artists working in film.

Peter Harcourt, POV Magazine, Issue # 45, Winter 2002

WALK NAKED SINGING
Screening this doc stone cold sober in the boss’s office is not the way to watch this story of 3 guys growing pot deep in Ontario woodland.
C. Dawson, Globe Television, June 1-7, 2002

Two ingratiatingly wacky marijuana farmers are profiled in Geoff Bowie’s wonderful new documentary “Walk Naked Singing”. What starts as a profile of two very strange non-conformists turns into a riff about what happened to the ideals of the 60s. The camerawork has a mesmerizing feel to it and the experience is one of melancholy mixed with elation.
Jim Bawden, StarWeek, June 1-7, 2002

WALK NAKED SINGING
Tonight on TV, the one to catch is The View From Here with Geoff Bowie’s remarkable documentary Walk Naked Singing. It’s about his buddies from the 60s who grow marijuana in the Ontario backwoods while they talk about old times together and what happened to the ideals of their generation.
Antonia Zerbisias, Toronto Star, June 5, 2002

More of what the critics say:

WALK NAKED SINGING

Following a growing season and two comic farmers in bandit bandanas, it’s a real life Cheech and Chong tale. Liam Lacey, The Globe & Mail, April 26, 2002

At once a touching portrait of a long lost friend, an evocatively rendered exercise in first person documentary, and a cogent indictment of laws that so fiercely police and punish the harvesting of a plant, Walk Naked Singing, demonstrates the same knack for “big picture thinking” one of its subjects says good dope facilitates. Geoff Pevere, Toronto Star, April 26, 2002

THE UNIVERSAL CLOCK: THE RESISTANCE OF PETER WATKINS

THE HOSPITAL AT THE END OF THE EARTH

A disturbing documentary about the human consequences of environmental calamity which airs on The Nature of Things. … the program shows a clear link between the medical emergency and a massive Soviet irrigation project launched in the 1960s. The project left the Aral Sea a desert and destroyed the economy and the way of life of a people.
Tony Atherton, Ottawa Citizen, March 19/01

Muynak has been ravaged by foolhardy irrigation policies which have drained rivers and left a crust of pesticide-laden dust in the basin of what was once the Aral Sea. The result has been an ecological and medical catastrophe.
Peggy Curran, Montreal Gazette, March 20/01

Bowie thrives on documenting complex human emotions.
Ian Nathanson, Ottawa Sun, March 21/01